Sinaing na isda sa sampalok (Steamed fish in tamarind)

I have been a lot of tuna (salpicao, burger steak or teriyaki) lately,
ignoring the smaller fishes sold in the market. However, when I saw this fish called “barilison” (means similar to bariles –> tuna in Tagalog), I knew one particular dish to cook it with! Barilison are smaller versions of the tuna, but incredibly meaty as well. They are similar to what we call “tulingan” back in Luzon. Tulingan is always cooked sinaing, steamed in kamias or bilimbi, acquiring a sour-salty tasty after cooking. Pair with steamed rice and diced tomatoes, and you’ve got a perfect meal. In my case, I couldn’t get any kamias so I settled for tamarind which also work well.
Clean the fish and pat dry. Slice lengthwise to the bone and add a little salt. Do the same to the other side. With the palm of your hands, press the fish to flatten at both sides. Do the same to the rest of the fish. In a claypot, place a layer of tamarind then add the fish. Add another layer of tamarind and fish, putting several layers depending on the amount you are cooking. End with a layer of tamarind. Add water till half-ful. Cook on high till it starts to boil then lower fire to let it simmer at least 30 minutes.
Best served with rice. You can eat this directly, or like what I do, I pan fry till fish is golden brown. Reserve the sauce as dipping sauce for the fried fish.

I have been eating a lot of tuna (salpicao, burger steak or teriyaki) lately, ignoring the smaller fishes sold in the market. However, when I saw this fish called “barilison” (means similar to bariles –> tuna in Tagalog), I knew one particular dish to cook it with!

barilison

Barilison are smaller versions of the tuna, but incredibly meaty as well. They a re similar to what we call “tulingan” back in Luzon. Tulingan is always cooked sinaing, steamed in kamias or bilimbi, acquiring a sour-salty tasty a fter cooking. Pair with steamed rice and diced tomatoes, and you’ve got a perfect meal.  In my case, I couldn’t get any kamias so I settled for tamarind which also work well.

sinaing

Clean the fish and pat dry. Slice lengthwise to the bone and add a little salt. Do the same to the other side. With the palm of your hands, press the fish to flatten at both sides. Do the same to the rest of the fish. In a claypot, place a layer of tamarind then add the fish. Add another layer of tamarind and fish, putting several layers depending on the amount you are cooking. End with a layer of tamarind. Add water till half-ful. Cook on high till it starts to boil then lower fire to let it simmer at least 30 minutes.

Best served with rice and chopped tomatoes. You can eat this directly, or like what I do, I pan fry till fish is golden brown. Reserve the sauce as dipping sauce for the fried fish.

Comments

  1. I only know few fish dishes and I am happy to be here. will try this. Thanks for sharing :)

  2. You’re welcome. There’s more to come as I’m really trying to incorporate more and more fish in my diet.

  3. wow, ansarap nito!

  4. I love sinaing na tulingan! Tapos ipa-fry sya…hmmm…

  5. Yes, fried pa… sarap nga.

  6. This is the ultimate dish in the list I have to construct and deconstruct….I wish I can identify “tulingan” here. You are really an inspiration. I have to come up with my food blog soon too…

  7. Neil, I can’t wait for your blog. I always remember you whenever I make my Asian inspired seafood pasta – tuna, sesame seeds, etc…

  8. I just learned that Tulingan is also known as Barilison here on your post. Now I know the difference between Bariles (Tuna) and the barilison. The barilison are indeed the young bariles or the young tunas.

    Also, I’m curious why this is called mackerel. Is tuna the same with mackerel? Or are all mackerels are tunas? Just wondering. thanks for sharing this. Cheers!:-)

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