Sotanghon with mushrooms and carrots

There are noodles and there are noodles. And there are noodles served most especially on special occasions. In the Philippines, noodles come in different colors and sizes. Of these, the sotanghon or vermicelli noodles made from mungbean is usually served on feasts like birthdays, Christmas, and New Year. This is a traditional food serve on feasts and I would say a perfect contribution to Monthly Mingle. No feast should be without noodles! It is usually sauteed with chicken and seldom with pork or other meats. Vegetables included would be carrots, cabbages, and snow peas. Like my pancit canton, I like mine chunky and with lots of mushrooms. My sotanghon version is actually a copycat from a resort I went to several years ago. I like the simple mixture of chicken, carrots and shiitake mushrooms so to this day, this is how I cook my sotanghon noodles.

sotanghon.JPG

Ingredients:

1 whole chicken breast
2 cups chicken broth
1 whole garlic, minced
3 cloves garlic. minced
1 large onion, sliced
1 large carrot, cut cross-wise
100 grams dried shiitake, reserve water after soaking
soy sauce to taste
crushed pepper to taste

1. Boil chicken breast till cooked. Reserve broth. Shred chicken into small pieces.
2. In 3 tablespoon oil, cook garlic until browned. Reserve.
3. Soak shiitake mushrooms till rehydrated. Reserve water. Squeeze mushrooms, remove stems then cut into quarters.
3. Heat 2 tablespoon oil, saute garlic, onion, chicken, soy sauce and pepper. Mix constantly till chicken is browned.
4. Add carrots and mushrooms. Saute and add chicken broth, around 1/4 cup at a time till carrots are half done. Add the remaining broth and bring to a boil.
5. Add the sotanghon noodles and mix well. Season to taste with salt and crushed pepper. Noodles are done if they are easy to cut with a spoon. You may taste the noodles to check if it is smooth as well as to determine the saltiness of the noodles. Add according to taste. (Note: This part is my dad’s favorite [well, me too...]. Time to sample if the noodles are good. He would usually hover in the kitchen and would tell me “Sample time!”). If noodles are not yet soft but the broth is drying up, add a little of mushroom water at a time till noodles are done.
6. Turn of heat then add the garlic and oil on the noodles. Mix well. Noodles will have a garlicky taste.

Maligang Pasko!!!

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Since this is a noodle dish, I would also say that this perfect for Pasta Presto Nights :)

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Comments

  1. hmm, sotanghon is one of my favourites. this sounds lovely with the shiitake mushrooms.

  2. A scientist in the kitchen says:

    Oh yes, the taste is not so complicated. I first tasted this at Eden Garden Resort in Mt Apo, Davo City. This is my favorite version since then.

  3. im sure masarap to… shiitake is one favorite mushrooms… i hope to try this too.. naku, ang dami mong interesting recipes, di ko na alam kung alin ang uunahin.. everything looks good eh! ;-)

  4. A scientist in the kitchen says:

    Thanks, Gita. I like to eat and cook kasi :)

  5. I do enjoy Filipino food immensely. This looks great!

  6. Luscious. Glass noodles are one of my favorites, so delicate and shimmery. Nice, easy, tasty recipe!

Trackbacks

  1. [...] to noodles and the next word that goes with is the kind of noodles. Hence we have pancit canton, pancit sotanghon, pancit malabon, and pancit molo.This week I share with you Pancit Molo, a type of noodle soup. The [...]

  2. [...] What’s a birthday without noodles? When my sister celebrated her birthday last month, we cooked a traditional noodle dish from Northern MIndanao. It is called bam-i, consisting of two types of noodles, the pancit canton and the sotanghon. Aside from that, the ingredients and manner of cooking is generally the same as canton or sotanghon. [...]

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